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An international peer-reviewed journal

Comparing Computer Versus Human Data Collection Methods for Public Usability Evaluations of a Tactile-Audio Display

Maria Karam, Carmen Branje, John-Patrick Udo, Frank Russo, and Deborah I. Fels

Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2010, pp. 132 - 146

Article Contents


About the Authors

Maria Karam

Maria Karam

Karam’s research focus is on human-computer interactions that are off-the-desktop, using alternative interaction techniques. Music is the main research area, ranging from gesture input to sensory substitution. Karam is also founder and director of the Coffee Lab, a public usability space in downtown Toronto.

 

Carmen Branje

Carmen Branje

Branje is a researcher at The Centre for Learning Technology at Ryerson University since 2003. His research interests are human factors engineering, human-computer interaction, cross modal translation, and multimodal interfaces. He will begin a PhD in Human Factors Engineering at the University of Toronto in the fall of 2009.

 

John-Patrick Udo

John-Patrick Udo

Udo has a Master's in Communication and Culture at Ryerson University and is currently a research fellow in the field of assistive and adaptive technology at the CLT. He is also an expert in universal design principles as applied to multimedia and entertainment technology.

 

Frank Russo

Frank Russo

Russo, a cognitive scientist, musician, and armchair engineer, is also Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Science of Music, Auditory Research, and Technology (SMART) lab. Russo sits on the editorial board of Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain and on the board of directors of the Canadian Acoustical Association and the Society for Music Perception, and Cognition.

 

Deborah I. Fels

Deborah I. Fels

Fels is a professor at Ryerson University and the head of the Centre for Learning Technologies (CLT). An expert in the field of assistive and adaptive technology, Fels and her research staff and students have been exploring accessible media, specifically enhanced and emotive captioning, and descriptive video since 1995.