The World Until Yesterday: What We Can Learn from Traditional Societies (Sketchnote)

Sketchnote

Jared Diamond gave a talk about his autobiographical book about his study in Papua, New Guinea. He started out wanting to understand the fascinating world, but the work soon morphed into studies of small, traditional communities. He draws lessons from New Guinean rules to live by, and compares modern and traditional societies. (Click the images for a larger view)


The sketchnote consists of small drawings with the following text:

  • Jared Diamond, Tuesday 1st Oct. 13 RI (Royal Institute)
  • An autobiographical book about his study in Papua New Guinea…then morphed into studies of small communities (traditional).
  • Motivation: just understanding the fascinating world.
  • He doesn’t have a computer or an iPhone or an actual phone.
  • New Guinean rules to live by: Don’t sleep under dead trees.
  • We need to kick ourselves into new sustainable habits.
  • We have different languages.
  • We have different attitudes to dangers.
  • Children are given much more freedom.
  • In nomadic societies with fluctuating food they sometimes desert, starve, or even kill the elderly.
  • In societies where people stay in the same place, they are surrounded by childhood friends.
  • Traditional societies have very little death associated with non-communicable diseases.
  • Disputes are often about emotional closure rather than right or wrong.
  • The lack of face to face communication and being able to read visual cues is a problem.
  • We are using one language per week.
  • Modern societies are all very similar. Traditional societies are much more varied.
  • New book: Nations in crisis (and individuals in crisis)
Wright, A. (2014). The World Until Yesterday: What We Can Learn from Traditional Societies (Sketchnote). User Experience Magazine, 14(1).
Retrieved from http://www.uxpamagazine.org/the-world-until-yesterday/

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